Live Well Wednesday

The Cost of Treating Diabetes

Edit THP_1041

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

Today’s topic is The Cost of Treating Diabetes by Andy Pierron, Compass Community Health Care Center Pharmacist.

In honor of November being Diabetes Awareness Month, we will be highlighting ways to help keep you on the road to good health, all this month during our #LiveWellWednesday posts. Be sure and check back each Wednesday afternoon for more information on diabetes provided by Compass Community Health Care Center Providers. 

As of January 1st Novolog, Novlin, and Levemir are all just $8.00 in multi-dose vials with a prescription from one of Compass Community Health’s providers.  In addition, Actos is just $14.00, Januvia is $3.50, Invokamet XR is $33.00 and Bydureon is just $18.00.  Not to mention the already low cost of glimepiride, glipizide, and metformin already offered.

This range of diabetic medication can be beneficial to all diabetics regardless of type of progression.  If you are newly diagnosed or have had diabetes most of your life, these affordable medications can help you.

Maintaining a normal blood sugar takes a lifetime of commitment but can reduce the likelihood of stroke, heart attack, blindness, neuropathy, and even amputations.  The team at Compass Community Health would like to help you with this commitment and your commitment to your health.  For more information on this topic or the Compass Pharmacy contact us at 740-351-1500.  You can also email the Compass Pharmacy at refills@compasscommunityhealth.org.  Our healthcare providers and team can be reached at 740-355-7102.

Live Well Wednesday

Get in the Know about Pneumonia, and Get Your Vaccine at Compass

Edit THP_1041

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

During the month of September we will be focusing on vaccinations and keeping you healthy this winter. Be sure and check back each Wednesday in September to get helpful information and tips from Compass Community Health Care Center Pharmacist Andy Pierron, on keeping yourself, and your family healthy all winter long.

Pneumonia can be a very serious illness if left untreated. One million hospitalizations occur each year due to pneumonia, and one in four of those patients hospitalized will die. Do you know the signs and symptoms of pneumonia? How to tell if you have just a common cold or pneumonia?

The most common sign is coughing, due to the lungs filling with fluid and infection. Other symptoms include, fever, chilling, difficulty breathing, chest pain and fatigue. It isn’t always obvious that it’s pneumonia, so be sure and see your provider should you experience these symptoms. More importantly, take extreme caution if you have asthma, diabetes, a heart condition, or other chronic illnesses, as pneumonia may set in faster and be more problematic those with chronic conditions.

Good news! There is a vaccine available to help prevent and reduce the chance that you and your loved one will suffer from pneumonia, and even better, this vaccine is available at Compass. Vaccinations are available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am until 6:00 pm at the Compass Pharmacy, and no appointment is necessary. The vaccine is covered by most insurance plans or at a very reduced cost for those paying out of pocket.

For additional information on this topic, or to schedule an appointment with one of our providers, please contact our office at 740-351-7102.

#LiveWellWednesday                           #CompassCares                                    #RealPeopleCompassionateCare

Live Well Wednesday

Don’t Let the Flu Get the Best of You This Winter- Get Your Flu Shot at Compass

Andy PTHP_5415_pp

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

During the month of September we will be focusing on vaccinations and keeping you healthy this winter.  Be sure and check back each Wednesday in September to get helpful information and tips from Compass Community Health Care Center Pharmacist Andy Pierron on keeping yourself, and your family healthy all winter long.

Each year the flu vaccine prevents millions of people from getting sick! Over two million medical office visits are avoided, as well as tens of thousands of hospitalizations.  According to the CDC, receiving a flu vaccination is the best way to guard yourself against getting the flu.  Don’t let the flu bug you this winter! Flu vaccinations are available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am until 6:00 pm at the Compass Pharmacy, no appointment is necessary.  The vaccine is covered by most medical plans or a very reduced cost for those paying out of pocket.

For additional information on this topic, or to schedule an appointment with one of our providers please contact our office at 740-351-7102.

#LiveWellWednesday                           #CompassCares                                    #RealPeopleCompassionCare

 

Live Well Wednesday

Don’t Bug Me- Keep the Ticks Away While You Play!

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

During the month of July we will be focusing on a new summertime weekly topic that addresses important seasonal issues.  Be sure and check back each Wednesday in July to get helpful information and tips from the Compass Community Health Care Center providers on keeping yourself, and your family healthy all summer long.

With the peak of the summer season upon us, and daylight hours lasting longer, our outdoor fun and activities keep us outside well into the evening hours.  Swimming, hiking, boating and soaking up the sun are enjoyed by many, but there are occasionally some uninvited guests.  Ticks are always present in high grass and forested areas, as well as neighborhood back yards.  Here are some tips to insure those tick pests don’t derail your summer fun.

Prevent tick bites by applying a repellant that contains DEET.  The amount of DEET should contain at least 20 percent for adults, but no more than 30 percent for children.  Consider wearing permethrin-treated clothing and avoid high grass and heavy brush areas when hiking.  Check your body thoroughly everyday, paying special attention to places bugs like to hide, like armpits, behind ears, in your hair, between the legs and even inside the belly button.

Should you find a tick, use a pair of fine-tipped tweezers to grasp it and pull upward slowly and steadily.  Do not twist, as this can leave the tick’s head in your skin.  Finally, dab the area with alcohol to disinfect.

Be aware to watch for signs of inflammation after the removal of a tick, and visual symptoms like a rash, or fever, fatigue, or flulike symptoms.  If you notice any of these, seek medical attention.  Keep in mind that Lyme disease often causes a “bulls-eye” rash.  Should your tick bite develop into anything like this picture, contact your doctor or visit the emergency department or urgent care nearest to you.tick2.jpg

For additional information on this topic, or to schedule an appointment with one of our providers please contact our office at 740-351-7102.

#LiveWellWednesday                           #CompassCares                                    #RealPeopleCompassionCare

 

 

Live Well Wednesday

Ask the Experts- What’s the best Way to Protect Yourself from Harmful UV Rays?

megan-whisman                                        Ryan green tie 2 THP_2548_ppv

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

During the month of July we will be focusing on a new summertime weekly topic that addresses important seasonal issues.  Be sure and check back each Wednesday in July to get helpful information and tips from the Compass Community Health Care Center providers on keeping yourself, and your family healthy all summer long.

This week we asked our providers at Compass Community Health Care Center…

“What do you do with your own family to protect your skin from harmful UV rays?

Megan Whisman, FNP: “Use sunscreen everyday, even on cloudy days, and reapply every couple hours.  Big hats will also limit the amount of skin exposure, and are super fun.”

Ryan Carpenter, FNP-BC: “When in doubt reapply your sunscreen.  Most people have a false sense of protection, especially ‘waterproof’ that isn’t really waterproof and wears off quickly.  Another often misconception is that 100 SPF gives you twice the time and protection as 50 SPF and that isn’t the case.”

Thea Floyd, RN: “I make sure my family uses a sunscreen of SPF 50 or higher, reapplying at least every hour while in direct sun, wear protective clothing, umbrellas, and avoid early afternoon sunlight.”

For additional information on this topic, or to schedule an appointment with one of our providers please contact our office at 740-351-7102.

#LiveWellWednesday                           #CompassCares                                    #RealPeopleCompassionCare

Live Well Wednesday

Ask the Experts– What’s the best way to stay hydrated in the summer?

megan-whisman                         Ryan green tie 2 THP_2548_ppv

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

During the month of July we will be focusing on a new summertime weekly topic that addresses important seasonal issues.  Be sure and check back each Wednesday in July to get helpful information and tips from the Compass Community Health Care Center providers on keeping yourself, and your family healthy all summer long.

This week we asked our providers at Compass Community Health Care Center…

“What do you do to keep yourself and your family hydrated during these hot summer days?”

Megan Whisman, FNP: “A few good tips to keep hydrated on hot summer days for my family is flavored ice cubes and fruit smoothies consisting of fruits high in water and yogurt.  Staying hydrated through what we eat is also important, watermelon is one of our big go to fruits.  And last but not least are homemade popsicles, our favorite summertime treat!”

Ryan Carpenter, FNP-BC: “Our family hiked through Death Valley last year and used hydration backpacks filled with water and frozen bottles of water.  I noticed that when water was readily available that my family stayed well hydrated.  Here’s an example of the hydration pack we used.”

hydration pack

For additional information on this topic, or to schedule an appointment with one of our providers, please contact our office at 740-351-7102.

#LiveWellWednesday                 #CompassCares                 #RealPeopleCompassionateCare

Live Well Wednesday

Heart and Stroke Disease: Leading Health Threats

Ryan green tie 2 THP_2548_ppv

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

Today’s topic is Heart Disease: A Leading Health Threat by Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner.

In honor of June being Men’s Health Awareness Month, we will be highlighting ways to help keep men on the road to good health, all this month during our #LiveWellWednesday posts. Be sure and check back each Wednesday afternoon for more information on men’s health with Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner. 

We’ve all been told about the importance of heart health in our daily lives, and the fact that heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death in both men and women.  It’s a huge global public health problem, and in the U.S. we have some of the highest rates in the world.

In cardiovascular disease, cholesterol plaques block the arteries in the heart and brain.  If a plaque becomes unstable, a blood clot forms, blocking the artery, causing a heart attack or stroke.

One in five men and women will die from cardiovascular disease.  For unclear reasons, though, men’s arteries develop atherosclerosis, or a “hardening of the arteries,” earlier than women’s.  According to the director of the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention at the CDC, Darin Labarthe, MD, “men’s average age for death from cardiovascular disease is under 65, and women catch up about six years later.”

Even in adolescence, girls’ arteries look healthier than boys’.  Experts believe women’s naturally high levels of good cholesterol (HDL) are partly responsible.  Men have to work much harder to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke.  Here are some great ways men can reduce their risk:

  • Get your cholesterol checked, beginning at age 25 and every 5 years thereafter.
  • Control your blood pressure and cholesterol.
  • Increase your physical activity level to 30 minutes per day, most days of the week.
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables and less saturated or trans fats.

Speak up, because no one knows your body better than you! At Compass Community Health Care Center, we’re here to discuss any questions or concerns you may have.  Please contact our office at 740-355-7102 to schedule an appointment.

#CompassCares    #LiveWellWednesday

Live Well Wednesday

Men’s Health with Ryan Carpenter

Ryan green tie 2 THP_2548_ppv

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

Today’s topic is Advanced Prostate Cancer Care by Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner.

In honor of June being Men’s Health Awareness Month, we will be highlighting ways to help keep men on the road to good health, all this month during our #LiveWellWednesday posts. Be sure and check back each Wednesday afternoon for more information on men’s health with Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner. 

 

Last week we focused on prostate health and nonmalignant growths of the prostate and this week we’ll look at prostate cancer care and hitting harder on advanced prostate cancer.  The latest clinical trial results showed that adding a Johnson and Johnson drug called Zytiga, or abiraterone, to standard hormone therapy for men with newly diagnosed advanced prostate cancer reduced their chance of death by about 40 percent.

“This will clearly result in the earlier use of abiraterone and should spur rapid FDA approval for this additional indication,” said Nancy Dawson, an oncologist at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center who was not involved in the research.   The medication already is approved for men whose prostate cancer worsens during the standard hormone treatment.

Men, remember to have regular routine PSA screenings of your prostate every year, beginning at age 50.  A PSA test is performed along with other tests when prostate cancer is suspected, but only a biopsy can confirm the presence of the disease.  There are a number of different ways to monitor and find prostate cancer.  Some of these include an MRI, a CT scan, a PET/CT scan, and a bone scan.  If you have already been treated for prostate cancer, the PSA test may be used to determine if the prostate cancer has returned.

Speak up, because no one knows your body better than you! Talk to your provider if you are experiencing any of these symptoms: tiredness/fatigue, trouble falling or staying asleep, aches, pains or discomfort, anxiety or stress as a result of pain, weakness/numbness, or difficulty doing normal daily activities.  At Compass Community Health Care Center, we’re here to discuss any questions or concerns you may have.  Please contact our office at 740-355-7102 to schedule an appointment.

#CompassCares #LiveWellWednesday

 

Live Well Wednesday

Prostate Health

Ryan green tie 2 THP_2548_ppv

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

Today’s topic is Prostate Health by Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner.

In honor of June being Men’s Health Awareness Month, we will be highlighting ways to help keep men on the road to good health, all this month during our #LiveWellWednesday posts. Be sure and check back each Wednesday afternoon for more information on men’s health with Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner. 

Men’s Health Month is celebrated across the country with screenings, health fairs, media appearances, and other health education and outreach activities, so it’s only fitting that we focus on the topic for our Live Well Wednesday series. Men’s Health is similar to other month long awareness campaigns like breast cancer, autism, and heart disease with a focused goal of providing education and heightened awareness of preventable health problems FOR MEN.

Today’s men’s health topic is benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) which is a common disorder in men with an incidence that increases with age. BPH often requires therapy when patients begin to experience lower urinary tract symptoms that affect quality of life.

I’m sure most men have heard of BPH at some point, but what is it really? BPH is characterized as nonmalignant growth of the prostate gland that occurs in most men over 40 years of age. The prevalence of BPH, as seen in several autopsy studies around the world, is estimated to be approximately 20% for men in their 40s, up to 60% for men in their 60s, and up to 90% for men in their 70s and 80s. Although almost all men will develop microscopic evidence of BPH by their eighth decade of life, the condition does not require treatment until it becomes symptomatic.

Diagnosis of BPH often rules out other clinical manifestations that may present with similar symptoms. Examples include prostate cancer, prostatitis, bladder cancer, bladder stones, overactive bladder (OAB), interstitial cystitis, and urinary tract infections. Although symptoms related to BPH are often not life-threatening, they can be debilitating and affect quality of life (QOL) significantly Thus, it is important to identify and correctly diagnose BPH in order to pursue an effective treatment strategy.

Current treatment guidelines range from watchful waiting to surgical intervention. However, there are many options in between that include lifestyle modifications, pharmacotherapy, and phytotherapy (plant based/herbal medications). At Compass Community Health Care Center, we’re here to discuss any further questions or concerns you may have, please contact our office at 740-355-7102 to schedule an appointment.

 

 

Live Well Wednesday

The New Era of Pharmacy

Andy PTHP_5415_pp.JPG

At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

Today’s topic is The New Era of Pharmacy by Andy Pierron, Compass Community Health Care Center Pharmacist and Director of Pharmacy Services.

Healthcare is a hot topic in our current daily lives, and this definitely includes the world of pharmacy.  Legislators are working to take steps and make decisions that will affect each one of our futures.  Doing  some research and gaining knowledge on each piece of the healthcare puzzle can help you understand what all this means to YOU.

Historically, the profession of pharmacy is known to be one of the most accessible professions in healthcare. The tremendous consumption of pharmaceuticals nationally and the development of electronic medical records and prescription processing has completely changed the daily job of the pharmacist.

To the eye of the consumer, pharmacy business has never been better.  However, the tremendous amount of money involved has caused insurances to reduce reimbursement, to reduce accessibility to coverage, and to steer therapy in order to control costs.   The result is an overly complex process, poor compliance, and a very confused consumer.   And, the opioid epidemic and the amount of overdoses now makes (and with good reason) the consumer more weary than ever.

As we forget that basic medications such as aspirin, blood pressure medications, cholesterol medications, and diabetic medications improve the quality of life and save lives, medical costs for open heart surgery, strokes, heart attacks, and kidney failure soar.

Now Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurances are taking a second look.  Recognizing that a covered member walking into a pharmacy doesn’t cost near as much as when the member is taken into an emergency room.  Capitalizing on the accessible profession of pharmacy, these insurances are now paying pharmacies to provide extensive consultation services including monitoring of compliance, drug interactions, and even paying pharmacist to provide more practical management of blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes.

For you the consumer, patient, and customer, this is an opportunity to better educate yourself, to better inform yourself, and to better guide yourself to good health.  The World Wide Web can be a web of misinformation and information without perspective, don’t take what you read as the same expertise you would receive from your provider.  Asking your pharmacist questions and following your prescriber’s medical recommendations is good medicine!

For additional information on this topic or to schedule an appointment with one of our providers, please contact our office 740-355-7102.
#LiveWellWednesday  #CompassCares