#CompassAdvocates

CRITICAL ALERT: Calling All Advocates!

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In the past few days, and even hours, there have been substantial changes within the healthcare arena. Due to the fast moving nature of both the state and federal legislative bodies, it’s critical that our advocates take the few short minutes required to respond to both Calls to Action below.

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The state budget is close to being decided upon and it’s not pretty. In its current state, the budget calls for a freeze on enrollment of the expanded group come July 1, 2018. This means, no new enrollees into the expanded category after said date, even if they would have qualified prior. Furthermore, new requirements for the program would exclude unemployed individuals actively seeking work and those seeking addiction treatment services but on waitlists from gaining access to affordable coverage. It’s critical that you take action and alert your state legislators about the dangers of the proposed budget TODAY!

Contact your state legislators today

On the federal side, the newest version of the AHCA has been released and, again, it’s not looking good. The plans, at present, are to phase out expansion dollars within four years and capping the amount of money states would receive per Medicaid enrollee. This would mean upwards of one million Ohioans, alone, being cut from the program. Again, it’s critically important advocates take the time to alert Senators Brown and Portman of the danger millions will face if the bill is enacted in its current form.

Click here now to send a strong health center message to Senators Brown and Portman today! 

Again, we need “All Hands on Deck” responding to these alerts if we are going to effectively fight for the right that no one goes without coverage or so that no one has to make the decision to feed their family over filling prescriptions for their chronic illnesses. Please share with your friends and family and ask for their support. And don’t forget to ask yourselves, “What happens tomorrow when millions of Ohioans lose their coverage.”

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Live Well Wednesday

Heart and Stroke Disease: Leading Health Threats

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At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

Today’s topic is Heart Disease: A Leading Health Threat by Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner.

In honor of June being Men’s Health Awareness Month, we will be highlighting ways to help keep men on the road to good health, all this month during our #LiveWellWednesday posts. Be sure and check back each Wednesday afternoon for more information on men’s health with Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner. 

We’ve all been told about the importance of heart health in our daily lives, and the fact that heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death in both men and women.  It’s a huge global public health problem, and in the U.S. we have some of the highest rates in the world.

In cardiovascular disease, cholesterol plaques block the arteries in the heart and brain.  If a plaque becomes unstable, a blood clot forms, blocking the artery, causing a heart attack or stroke.

One in five men and women will die from cardiovascular disease.  For unclear reasons, though, men’s arteries develop atherosclerosis, or a “hardening of the arteries,” earlier than women’s.  According to the director of the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention at the CDC, Darin Labarthe, MD, “men’s average age for death from cardiovascular disease is under 65, and women catch up about six years later.”

Even in adolescence, girls’ arteries look healthier than boys’.  Experts believe women’s naturally high levels of good cholesterol (HDL) are partly responsible.  Men have to work much harder to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke.  Here are some great ways men can reduce their risk:

  • Get your cholesterol checked, beginning at age 25 and every 5 years thereafter.
  • Control your blood pressure and cholesterol.
  • Increase your physical activity level to 30 minutes per day, most days of the week.
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables and less saturated or trans fats.

Speak up, because no one knows your body better than you! At Compass Community Health Care Center, we’re here to discuss any questions or concerns you may have.  Please contact our office at 740-355-7102 to schedule an appointment.

#CompassCares    #LiveWellWednesday

News & Events

Compass Community Health Care Center Earns Renewed FQHC Status To Provide Primary Health Care

Scioto County, Ohio – Compass Community Health Care Center (CCHCC) announced today they have successfully been designated renewed status as a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC ) designee until 2020, and awarded the accompanying funding for a total amount of $2.1 million, which will mean $701,472 annually, for the next three years to enhance services and patient care.

Compass CEO Summer Kirby said, “The funding award enhances our ability to reduce barriers to care. It is vital that we maintain awareness of how to address the needs of our patients and community.  Everyone should have access to affordable, high quality health care, regardless of insurance coverage.  Our team remains committed to growing our existing health services and expanding services when we see an opportunity to address our patient’s whole health.”

Kirby also recognizes this award for excellence as an endorsement of the Compass health care team, and says, “A patient’s experience and improved outcomes is a direct reflection of the caring and compassionate team we have here at Compass. Over and over, our patient satisfaction surveys comment on how our providers take their time and really listen to our patients. We all work together to provide quality, family-style, primary health care for everyone in the community.”

Under the Public Health Service Act, FQHCs provide core primary and preventive health care services to underserved populations. In addition to primary care, Compass also offers in house pharmacy services and consultation, connection to community agencies and programs through Outreach and Enrollment services, help with transportation to the office and any other related doctor appointments; as well as on-site specialized services for behavioral health and pediatric occupational therapy services.

Compass Medical Director Dr. John Turjoman
Compass Medical Director Dr. John Turjoman

Compass Medical Director Dr. John Turjoman said, “We are dedicated to providing high quality and compassionate care to all in our community regardless of barriers patients may have run into in the past. Compass Community Health Care Center is constantly evolving and growing, and will adjust our services as we see our community’s needs change. Our services encompass not only the immediate local community, but all of Scioto county and the surrounding area.”

Compass Community Health Care Center, located at 1634 – 11th Street, US Highway 52E, Portsmouth, Ohio, is open to all in the community and always welcoming new patients. Call for more information, (740) 355-7102.

Live Well Wednesday

Men’s Health with Ryan Carpenter

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At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

Today’s topic is Advanced Prostate Cancer Care by Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner.

In honor of June being Men’s Health Awareness Month, we will be highlighting ways to help keep men on the road to good health, all this month during our #LiveWellWednesday posts. Be sure and check back each Wednesday afternoon for more information on men’s health with Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner. 

 

Last week we focused on prostate health and nonmalignant growths of the prostate and this week we’ll look at prostate cancer care and hitting harder on advanced prostate cancer.  The latest clinical trial results showed that adding a Johnson and Johnson drug called Zytiga, or abiraterone, to standard hormone therapy for men with newly diagnosed advanced prostate cancer reduced their chance of death by about 40 percent.

“This will clearly result in the earlier use of abiraterone and should spur rapid FDA approval for this additional indication,” said Nancy Dawson, an oncologist at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center who was not involved in the research.   The medication already is approved for men whose prostate cancer worsens during the standard hormone treatment.

Men, remember to have regular routine PSA screenings of your prostate every year, beginning at age 50.  A PSA test is performed along with other tests when prostate cancer is suspected, but only a biopsy can confirm the presence of the disease.  There are a number of different ways to monitor and find prostate cancer.  Some of these include an MRI, a CT scan, a PET/CT scan, and a bone scan.  If you have already been treated for prostate cancer, the PSA test may be used to determine if the prostate cancer has returned.

Speak up, because no one knows your body better than you! Talk to your provider if you are experiencing any of these symptoms: tiredness/fatigue, trouble falling or staying asleep, aches, pains or discomfort, anxiety or stress as a result of pain, weakness/numbness, or difficulty doing normal daily activities.  At Compass Community Health Care Center, we’re here to discuss any questions or concerns you may have.  Please contact our office at 740-355-7102 to schedule an appointment.

#CompassCares #LiveWellWednesday

 

Live Well Wednesday

Prostate Health

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At Compass Community Health Care Center we are dedicated to providing the best health care possible. We are listening to our patients, families, and community with their health concerns and questions. Watch for #LiveWellWednesday posts each Wednesday, which focus on giving you the information and tips you need to understand current health care concerns and topics.

Today’s topic is Prostate Health by Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner.

In honor of June being Men’s Health Awareness Month, we will be highlighting ways to help keep men on the road to good health, all this month during our #LiveWellWednesday posts. Be sure and check back each Wednesday afternoon for more information on men’s health with Ryan Carpenter, Compass Community Health Care Center Family Nurse Practitioner. 

Men’s Health Month is celebrated across the country with screenings, health fairs, media appearances, and other health education and outreach activities, so it’s only fitting that we focus on the topic for our Live Well Wednesday series. Men’s Health is similar to other month long awareness campaigns like breast cancer, autism, and heart disease with a focused goal of providing education and heightened awareness of preventable health problems FOR MEN.

Today’s men’s health topic is benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) which is a common disorder in men with an incidence that increases with age. BPH often requires therapy when patients begin to experience lower urinary tract symptoms that affect quality of life.

I’m sure most men have heard of BPH at some point, but what is it really? BPH is characterized as nonmalignant growth of the prostate gland that occurs in most men over 40 years of age. The prevalence of BPH, as seen in several autopsy studies around the world, is estimated to be approximately 20% for men in their 40s, up to 60% for men in their 60s, and up to 90% for men in their 70s and 80s. Although almost all men will develop microscopic evidence of BPH by their eighth decade of life, the condition does not require treatment until it becomes symptomatic.

Diagnosis of BPH often rules out other clinical manifestations that may present with similar symptoms. Examples include prostate cancer, prostatitis, bladder cancer, bladder stones, overactive bladder (OAB), interstitial cystitis, and urinary tract infections. Although symptoms related to BPH are often not life-threatening, they can be debilitating and affect quality of life (QOL) significantly Thus, it is important to identify and correctly diagnose BPH in order to pursue an effective treatment strategy.

Current treatment guidelines range from watchful waiting to surgical intervention. However, there are many options in between that include lifestyle modifications, pharmacotherapy, and phytotherapy (plant based/herbal medications). At Compass Community Health Care Center, we’re here to discuss any further questions or concerns you may have, please contact our office at 740-355-7102 to schedule an appointment.